Saamy Square Movie Review: Tacky VFX and dialogues ruin Vikram film

Vikram in Saamy Square

or 90s kids, director Hari and Vikram’s Saamy (2003) is an unforgettable film. The film catapulted Vikram to superstardom and still remains one of his best works to date. If we revisit Saamy today, it would still qualify as one of the best commercial cop-dramas.

So 15 years later when Saamy Square was announced, it posed two questions. Will it match up to Saamy? And will the sequel spoil the prequel for us? Well, the answer is that Saamy Square is no match for its prequel.

Vikram’s Saamy Square is primarily a revenge saga. Ram Saamy (son Vikram) avenges the death of his father (Aarusaamy) and punishes the Pichai brothers – Mahendra (OAK Sundar), Devendra (John Vijay) and Ravana (Bobby Simhaa).

Along with the revenge part, Hari has also included some romance, a sentimental mother angle and comedy (which was terrible) to cater to people of all age groups.

Director Hari’s films follow a similar pattern and they are all fast-paced. Surprisingly, the first-half of Saamy Square is very unlike Hari. It moves at a snail’s pace and tests your patience with Soori’s so-called comedy.

Vikram is back in khaki with Saamy Square. The film’s first half is a colossal letdown, but director Hari makes it up with a fast-paced second half, says our review. The first half is a bore-fest. With tacky VFX, over-exaggerated stunt sequences and a loud hero, it is a terrible start to a cop flick. However, Hari erases his flaws with the racy second half.

When you come up with a sequel to a super-successful film, comparisons with the original are inevitable. Much to our disappointment, Saamy Square does not have any exciting sequences as Saamy did. This could be a huge setback for the sequel.

Playing a cop comes easy to Vikram and it is just a cakewalk for him. Vikram is effortless as Ram Saamy and Aarusaamy, and manages to bring back memories of Saamy with his performance.

However, Vikram’s words and actions are contradictory. He says that one should treat a woman with respect and goes around slapping them. Hari’s writing is not as nuanced as it used to be.

Keerthy Suresh plays Diya, a damsel in distress throughout the movie. After delivering a stellar performance in Mahanati (Nadigaiyar Thilagam in Tamil), she’s back to square one. Aishwarya Rajesh has replaced Trisha in the sequel. She has given a satisfactory performance but her pairing with Vikram fails to invoke memories of Saamy.

Another huge disappointment in Saamy Square is its tacky VFX and its ridiculous placement. Take this scene, for instance. Whenever Ram Saamy’s body comes in contact with a man wearing a police uniform, we see a golden light around him. And Ram acts like he’s possessed by his father’s spirit. These scenes are supposed to be ‘massy’ but end up as unintentionally hilarious.

Soori’s comedy is just terrible in Saamy Square, just like how it was in Seema Raja. The comedy, songs and uninteresting flashback scenes weigh the film down.

Fortunately, the second half of Saamy Square is much better than the first half. Even though it uses the cliched revenge story template, it proceeds swiftly and doesn’t give the audience much time to think.

Saamy Square’s premise had enough meat to qualify as a perfect commercial entertainer. But a sluggish first half and weak writing in parts make the film enjoyable only in certain places.

[“source=indiatoday]